Venture Out

Why Land Acknowledgments Matter

Colorado has a complicated and complex history with indigenous and native people and communities. We get it. We’re a year-round mountain resort designed for vacation and adventure. Why are we diving into the complexities of history and conflict? Why can’t people just come and enjoy their day on the slopes? 

Those are all questions we’ve asked ourselves as we’ve embarked on our journey to open the doors of mountain adventure to more people and for our resort to be an inclusive place for everyone. We are a place for adventure, transformation, and rejuvenation, but we can’t be that to everyone until we fully understand our history and why some people choose not to come or feel like they’re not welcome in the first place. 

Native and indigenous peoples are the original stewards of the land, and the mountains, forests, and plains are much more than just outdoor spaces. They’re a source of life, ancestry, and heritage. There’s a deep connection and sense of gratitude toward the land, and it was and remains home for many native communities.  

We are a place for adventure, transformation, and rejuvenation, but we can’t be that to everyone until we fully understand our history and why some people choose not to come or feel like they’re not welcome in the first place. 

As skiers, snowboarders, and mountain adventurers, we know many of you feel that same deep connection and gratitude toward the mountain, regardless of your background, race, or ethnicity. We’re simply trying to articulate the source of that connection, and we’ve found that it begins with the history of this land.  

Our land acknowledgment is a way of offering respect to native and indigenous people, both those who were here long before any of us and those who still call Winter Park and the Fraser Valley home. It helps to correct the practice of erasing or limiting history to only the stories we want to tell. It recognizes that indigenous people are still a vital part of the land and the future. Our land acknowledgment is a small step toward reconciliation, acceptance, and inclusion.   

As skiers, snowboarders, and mountain adventurers, we know many of you feel that same deep connection and gratitude toward the 
mountain…

The land acknowledgment statement is a first step. To further Winter Park’s commitment to inclusion, and to apply action to our statement, we have planned additional activities with native and indigenous peoples and communities. We established an ongoing professional relationship with native skiers and outdoor enthusiasts, who advise and consult with us on the topics of inclusion, and environmental sustainability. Winter Park Resort is also working with local tribal leaders to introduce more native youth to skiing and snowboarding and to invite adults to visit and explore what to many is their ancestral homeland. 

Go HERE to read our land acknowledgment statement.

Visit HERE for more information about how our resort has honored native communities with the naming of Eagle Wind and its trails.  

Visit HERE to learn how we can connect with water through skiing.

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